Jessie Haas

award-winning children's horse books

BOOKS

The Horse Lover's Encyclopedia
Bramble and Maggie books
Four early readers about a horse and her girl
Early Readers
Help beginners onto that tall horse called Reading. Easy chapter books including Bramble and Maggie
Picture Book
A picture book about the sweet science of maple sugar. Illustrations by Jos. A. Smith
History for children and adults
history for children and adults
Nonfiction horse books
Nonfiction horse books for children and adults
Poetry
Horses from prehistory to today, our ecstatic and tangled relationship with them, and their powerful effect on history, explored in many kinds of poems. YA and As of all ages who love horses and histlry.
Middle-grade and YA novels
Saige, American Girl of the Year Chico's Challenge, Chase
My Stable
e-books and out-of-print editions

The Horse Lover's Blog

Horses Are Not Human: Or, Why I Don't Blanket

February 14, 2017

Tags: horses, horse lover's encyclopedia, the horse lover, the horse lover's blog, Jessie Haas, Storey Publishing, blanketing horses, anthropomorphism

Horses are not human.
Obvious, right? I don't mean they aren't persons, or individuals, or that they don't have feelings, or that I don't love them. I mean that they do not have human bodies, or human needs. They have horse needs, for horse bodies and minds that evolved in different circumstances than ours did.
I keep my horses beside a well-traveled road. That means the general public can see how they live and form opinions, and I'm sure many people would feel much happier to see my three wrapped up in cozy blankets.
But here's the deal. That's not what they evolved for. It's not what they need.
In a fascinating article on the Soul of a Horse blog, Natalja Aleksandrova discusses how horses' winter coats, and the fat they accumulate in the autumn, insulate them from cold. The ability of the hair to fluff up and stand out from the body, and the oil that prevents water from penetrating from the skin, can all be compromised by the tender loving care we give them. Blankets can flatten the coat. Grooming can remove the oils. A cozy winter stable can raise levels of ammonia (from urine, manure, and bedding) and cause lung problems.
So my horses stay unblanketed, with access to turnout 24/7. They generally go ungroomed from November until the hair starts to fly. I'll admit that I didn't know why these were good practices until today. They worked well for my horses for some 50 years, though, and now I know more about why.
Hoofprints; Horse Poems; the jacket art is by Alison D. Rieder.

Keeping Barney, my first novel

Woodgate Martha V.

At the Anderson-Abruzzo International Balloon Museum in Albuquerque

Saige and I presenting at the Mater Christi School


Saige and Picasso, the Spanish Barb horse, beautifully created by Sarah Davis.

Atherton

Atherton and Zeke